Traffic Regulation Orders in place for major road resurfacings in Surrey Heath

I’ve received an email from Surrey Highways informing me of the Traffic Regulations Orders [TRO’s] in place from April 1st 2015 for temporary road closures of roads named below. The note says that the “works are anticipated to be carried out as soon as possible within the eighteen-month period of operation of this Order”.

I hope its ASAP and not 18 months. Delighted to see the washboard surface on Guildford Road in Lightwater near its junction with Ambleside Road is to be resurfaced. I bet some utility company will follow up not long after and dig up the nicely relaid road surface.

  • Windlesham Road, Chobham, between its junction with Halebourne Lane and its junction with Windsor Road. Works are anticipated to be carried out between the hours of 07:00hrs and 19:00hrs. Vehicular traffic will be diverted via Halebourne Lane, Bagshot Road, High Street and Windsor Road or this route in reverse order;
  • Ambleside Road, Lightwater, between its junction with Guildford Road and its junction with Macdonald Road. Works are anticipated to be carried out between the hours of 07.00hrs and 19.00hrs. Vehicular traffic will be diverted via Macdonald Road, Red Road and Guildford Road or this route in reverse order;
  • Buckingham Way, Chobham between its junction with Field Lane and its junction with Balmoral Drive. Works are anticipated to be carried out between the hours of 07:00hrs and 19:00hrs, vehicular traffic will be diverted via Field Lane, Bret Harte Road, Ansell Road, Frimley Road and Balmoral Drive or this route in reverse order:
  • Guildford Road, Lightwater, between its junction with Lightwater Road and its junction with Ambleside Road. Works are anticipated to be carried out between the hours of 07:00hrs and 19:00hrs. Vehicular traffic will be diverted via Guildford Road, Lightwater By-Pass and Guildford Road or this route in reverse order:
  • Knoll Road, Camberley, between its junction with Portesbury Road and its junction with London Road. Works are anticipated to be carried out between the hours of 07:00hrs and 19:00hrs, vehicular traffic will be diverted via Portesbury Road, Pembroke Broadway, Southwell Park Road, The Avenue, Frimley Road and London Road or this route in reverse order:
  • Townside Place, Camberley, between its junction with Knoll Road and its junction with Valroy Close. Works are anticipated to be carried out between the hours of 07:00hrs and 19:00hrs. There is no diversion available for this temporary closure:
  • Vale Road, Camberley, between its junction with Frimley Road and its junction with Doman Road. Works are anticipated to be carried out between the hours of 07:00hrs and 19:00hrs. Traffic will be diverted via Doman Road, Glebeland Road, Stanhope Road, Queen Mary Avenue, Edward Avenue and Frimley Road or this route in reverse order:
  • Frimley Road, Camberley, between its junction with Portsmouth Road and its junction with London Road. Works are anticipated to be carried out overnight between the hours of 20.00hrs and 06.00hrs. Traffic will be diverted via Portsmouth Road and London Road or this route in reverse order.

Additional funding barely keeping pace with road and pothole repairs

AIA pothole image copyAccording to the 20th Annual Local Authority Road Maintenance (ALARM) survey, published on 26th March 2015, it highlights “a massive 33 per cent increase in the number of potholes filled over the last year − but no reduction in the amount needed to bring the network up to scratch”.

Somewhat disappointingly only 52% of local authorities responded to the survey, as against 74% for the 19th annual report. I’ve reported on this survey in previous years, especially their summaries of Key Findings.

The survey contains plenty of data to digest, and the Key Findings from it are:

  • £12.16 billion, estimated one-time cost to get roads back into reasonable condition
  • £71 million, estimated one-time cost per authority in England & Wales to get roads back into reasonable condition
  • 2,670,350 million potholes filled in England & Wales
  • £548.6 million annual budget shortfall across England and Wales
  • £3.2 million annual budget shortfall per authority in England & Wales
  • 13 years to clear backlog in England & Wales
  • £23 million total cost of road user compensation claims
  • 64 years – average time before road is resurfaced in England (31 years in London; 59 years in Wales)

As a reminder to readers, you can report potholes in Surrey HERE. It’s a simple and easy process. It helps to attach a photo of the pothole, as then there’s visible evidence of its seriousness.

Surrey Heath Museum’s exciting upcoming wartime-themed events calendar

Surrey Heath Museum has announced its hosting of a series of exciting upcoming wartime-themed events over the next four months.

  • 22 April 2015, 6.30pm to 8pm: Gallipoli Remembered – A fascinating talk on the Gallipoli World War I campaign by local historian Murray Rowlands. Cost: £2.50. Advanced booking essential.
  • 29 April 2015, 6pm to 8pm: Military Remnants leaflet – The launch event for the leaflet. The leaflet features a hand-drawn map illustrating the borough’s rich military heritage. Cost: free.
  • 6 May 2015 & 15 July 2015, 9.30am to 12.30pm: RMA Sandhurst Monuments and Memorial Walk – An exciting walking tour of RMA Sandhurst and its Old College building, plus other fascinating highlights. Cost: £25.00. Advanced booking essential.
  • 9 May 2015, 11am to 4pm: Behind the Scenes at the Museum – A chance for visitors to gain an insight into the workings of the Museum. Cost: free.
  • 6 June 2015, 12pm to 4pm: Women’s Institute Wartime Bake Off – A competition and crafts event held at Camberley Theatre. Cost: free.
  • 10 June 2015, 6.30pm to 8pm: Two World Wars of Music – Alan Grace explores the music which captured both world wars. Cost: £2.50. Advanced booking essential.

For more information on Surrey Heath Museum and to book for upcoming events, visit www.surreyheath.gov.uk/museum, email museum@surreyheath.gov.uk, or phone 01276 707284/07598 193223.

Surrey Heath Museum’s ‘Wartime Home’ exhibition – a must visit for kids and adults alike

Us older folks always enjoy an opportunity for reflection on what life was life when we were young. Surrey Heath Museum’s latest exhibition provides just that opportunity. Over the past week or so I’ve watched the Museum’s Wartime Home exhibition evolve.

It’ll be a treat for adults, parents and kids. Parents, or should I say grandparents, can show children what life was like before TV, computer, and modern labour saving devices. Kids will be amazed. Parents, and grandparents will be nostalgic. A must visit exhibition.

Surrey Heath’s announcement of the exhibition says [click on image to expand],

Wartime Home PosterYou can experience what it was like to occupy a home during the war as part of Surrey Heath Museum’s exciting free Wartime Home exhibition running from 28 March 2015 to 13 June 2015.

The exhibition offers visitors the chance to explore an authentic recreation of a wartime home featuring interiors from both the First and Second World Wars, plus an impressive air raid shelter.

Funded by the Surrey Heath Armed Forces Covenant – which aims to strengthen links between the borough’s armed forces and residents – the exhibition features furnishings all sourced from the Museum’s collection.

Surrey Heath Museum Curator, Gillian Barnes-Riding, said: “We are thrilled to have such an exciting exhibition taking place right here at the Museum and one which will give visitors a great insight into what living in a wartime home was really like.

“Surrey Heath’s military heritage spans over 200 years, with such vast links to local military establishments including RMA Sandhurst, Deepcut and the Cadet Training Centre at Frimley, all highlighting why it is important to recognise the contribution of soldiers and military personnel past and present.”

Attending my final council Performance and Audit Scrutiny meetings

The Agendas were pretty thin for last night’s Performance and Audit Scrutiny meetings, the last of this council year and my last one too. See details of the Audit meeting HERE, and the Performance meeting HERE.

In both meetings there was some good news, which is worth passing on to you.

In the Audit meeting members considered the Council’s Policy and Procedure for the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 [RIPA], and the annual report on authorisations granted for direct, or covert surveillance.

The council’s RIPA policy was reviewed by the Office of Surveillance Commission in November 2014. The Inspector’s conclusion said,

This may be regarded as a very satisfactory inspection. A very professional, efficient, knowledgeable and enthusiastic team of officers is extremely very well placed to run a RIPA compliant operation should the Council decide to make use of the RIPA provisions.

During the municipal year 2014/2015 there were no authorisations, reviews or renewals under RIPA for the carrying out of direct surveillance.

Result: Good news, that the council policy passed inspection, and that the council hasn’t authorised any direct or covert surveillance.

In the Performance meeting members received the report of Council Finances as at 31st December 2014. Item 4 of the report said that the council’s revenue budget is expected to be £98,000 under budget by the end of the financial year [see Annex A of the report for more information].

Also in the report – see in Annex C – a change in the council’s investment policy, to take on higher risk, has already shown a positive change. The longer term investments are bringing in between 4.0 and 4¼%. A huge improvement over past investments in the government’s Debt Management Office that gave 0.25%.

Result: Good news that we’re using our money to earn better returns than in recent years.

 

Did you see the car in the ditch this week on the bends on Red Road?

Car in ditch on Red Road bendsWell, I did. Although I only managed today to visit the site, and the car has been removed.

Here’s my photo of the site, taken from the heathland [click to enlarge]. To the extreme left in the photo you can see the remnants of the police tape. As to where the car ended up, it was facing backwards into the heathland quite close to the turning into the heathland.

I wonder whether the lack of warning sign, recently demolished in an earlier accident and not yet replaced, was in any way a contributing factor? Looks like again we’ll need to press for the signs to be replaced.