Visiting the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew

A couple of weeks ago we visited the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew.

Within its over 320 acres there’s plenty to see and experience. We managed just a part. It’s one of 31 world heritage sites in the UK. The variety of trees and plants is amazing.

Memorable things in our visit were the Palm House, Treetops Walkway, Rock Gardens, and Kew Palace. Opening the door into the Palm House one is assailed by heat and humidity, and when climbing the steps to the elevated walkway the heat and humidity rises. From the elevated walkway lets you appreciate the structure of the building, and its age, having been built in the 1840’s.

The Treetop Walkway is a fun way to study trees from above. There’s a lift for those not wanting to climb the 108 steps. Kew Palace, also known as the Dutch House, provides an unexpected insight in building techniques and practices of the 1600 and 1700 hundreds. A visit of varied attractions, as my photo montage shows,

Interested in trees – come along to the inaugural meeting of Surrey Heath Tree Wardens

Two Camberley residents, Trefor Hogg and Jerry Brownlee, are instigating a tree warden scheme for Surrey Heath, in conjunction the the Borough Council’s Arboricultural Officer.

They’re looking for tree wardens and helpers in every ward and village in Surrey Heath. I’m told that there are two volunteers in West End, in addition to Trefor and Jerry.

There’s an existing Surrey Tree Wardens Network, with Trefor and Jerry looking to establish the Surrey Heath element. Trefor says,

We will be holding our first full meeting on 25th September 7:00 pm, in the Olive Room, The Link Building, St John the Baptist Church, Church Road, Windlesham GU20 6BL.

This is early notification of the meeting, an agenda will be published on Facebook shortly. If you’re interested to helping lease let jerry.brownlee@ntlworld.com or treforh@hotmail.com know if you’re intending to attend.

Always good to be in at the beginning. Trefor’s Facebook Page is HERE.

Fact: Surrey Heath is the greenest Borough and has the highest tree cover in Britain at 40.6%.

Here are a couple of interesting photos of trees in the borough, one of Phillyrea latifolia by Bagshot Station, and another of an unusually shaped Scots Pine in Lightwater Country Park.

Ranger’s notes for autumn on Brentmoor Heath and Folly Bog

Two things to report from my walk in our local heathland this week.

The Surrey Wildlife Trust Ranger for Brentmoor Heath and Folly Bog has provided notes on autumn in the heathland, in which it states that Belted Galloway Cattle have returned to munch invasive plants.

Below are my photos of the Rangers’s notes, posted on the kissing gates into the heathland, and the cattle munching purple moor grass. [Click on photos to expand]

Thank you to The Little Letting Company and Seymours Estate Agents for your speedy response

This is public thanks to Seymours Estate Agents and The Little Letting Company for their prompt action in removing estate agents for sale/rent advertising boards.

I do try not to be a busybody. I hope I can call myself a concerned citizen instead. For many weeks Seymours Estate Agents had an advertising board on land adjacent to Red Road, and near the junction with Briar Avenue.

I’d been meaning to contact Seymours for a while, fearing that leaving one board in position would attract others, which is what happened. A phone call to Seymours resulted in pleasingly prompt action to remove the board, similarly with The Little Letting Company. It’s not the estate agents directly, but their contractors who, adventurously, place the boards for maximum exposure.

It’s all about curtilage, which I’ve written about previously, most latterly HERE and HERE.

 

Scratched and bloodied in re-opening the path to Folly Bog

I say that I was bloodied in re-opening the path to Folly Bog. I massively overstate the amount of blood, it was a couple of small pricks from the gorse that drew blood.

A couple of days ago, here, I said secateurs were needed to regain access to Folly Bog. Yesterday I took secateurs and a pair of thick gloves to the task to re-opening the path. The gloves are worn out in a couple of fingers, hence pricks from the gorse drawing blood.

I’ll report of what I found down in Folly Bog in a later article. Meanwhile, here are the photos on before and after. Re-opening the path isn’t the answer to the meaning of life, I’m just happy to be able to visit the bog again.

Windlesham Field of Remembrance celebrates its Green Flag Award

Not to be outdone by the Green Flag Award to Frimley Lodge Park, the Windlesham Field of Remembrance has also received a Green Flag Award. This, from their website,

Chair of Trustees, of the Windlesham Field of Remembrance, Suzanne Sharman said: “We are absolutely delighted to receive a Green Flag Award for the second year running.

“We know how much quality green spaces matter to residents and visitors, and this award celebrates the dedication that goes into maintaining Windlesham FoR to such a high standard.“The award means a great deal to the Windlesham Community who continue to be responsible for the funding, management and maintenance of The Field.

International Green Flag Award scheme manager Paul Todd said: “We are delighted to be celebrating another record-breaking year for the Green Flag Award scheme.

“Each flag is a celebration of the thousands of staff and volunteers who work tirelessly to maintain the high standards demanded by the Green Flag Award. The success of the scheme, especially in these challenging times, demonstrates just how much parks matter to people.”