Government provide UK energy mix statistics in detail – notable reduction in coal

For readers who, might – just might, have become interested in the current state of the UK’s energy issues, I’ve got a couple more articles on the topic to feed that interest.

In the December 22nd Press Notice from the Department for Business, Energy, & Industrial Strategy on the release of Qtr3 2016 UK energy statistics is this,

Low carbon electricity’s share of generation accounted for a record high 50.0 per cent in the third quarter of 2016, up from 45.3 per cent in the same period of 2015, with increased generation from renewables (wind and solar) and nuclear.

uk-low-carbon-energy-stats-dec-2016

What’s startling in the Press Notice is the table showing the reduction in the amount of coal used for power generation. See table below. This important change is explained in the complete UK Energy Trends statistics for Qtr3 2016 – all 110 pages of it. Here’s part of the story from the report – associated with the table below.

Coal production in the third quarter of 2016 was 1.0 million tonnes, 28 per cent lower than the third quarter of 2015. This was mainly due to the last large deep mine Kellingley closing in December 2015. Deep mine production fell by 99 per cent to 5 thousand tonnes (a new record low). There are just seven small deep mines remaining. Surface mine production rose by 1.8 per cent to 1.0 million tonnes

coal-qtr3-dec-2016

Wind energy supplies almost 25% of UK power demand

I see the increasing use of renewable power as encouraging. Here’s a couple of screen captures Gridwatch over Christmas [firstly from 24th, and then 26th December] that shows wind power generating almost one quarter of the UK’s power needs. There are days when wind power generation is negligible, I am, therefore, a believer in the need for nuclear power to generate the base load of UK power needs.

gridwatch_24_dec_2016

gridwatch-1400hrs-26th-dec-2016

I’m pleased to see the UK’s investment in wind power starting to payoff. The offshore London Array wind farm in the Thames Estuary is currently the largest in the world, with 630 turbines. It’s disappointing that the UK has little involvement in ownership, manufacturing, or research and development of wind power turbines. One market where, as a nation, we can make up for that lack of expertise is in battery technology – see Giant UK battery launch, and HERE, and with Dyson.