Impressions on visiting the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao: 3 of 3 – The Art on View

This is the last article on my impressions of The Guggenheim Museum Bilbao.

In previous articles on the Guggenheim Bilbao I was unreasonably harsh about its overall lack of humour. How could I have forgotten Jeff Koons ‘Puppy’ outside the Museum. I’m sure it has some form of conceptual art meaning, which I’ve not sought to discover. To unintellectual me it’s simply clever, entertaining, and mildly amusing, and looks expensive to maintain  – see photos below.

Humour, though unintended, came, through listening on the provided wand, from the pretentious, overwrought descriptions of some of the art work, especially in the gallery of enormous works by Anselm Kiefer.

On the ground floor of the Museum is a gallery of eight sculptures by Richard Serra, entitled The Matter of Time. In reading this Museum’s description, there’s a higher level of intellectual interpretation than I’m capable of. Sculpture is an art form that begs to be touched, think of Henry Moore, or Barbara Hepworth.

The Museum website asks, How do you feel when you look at the painting below by Mark Rothko?

It replies, saying,

Rothko’s picture exemplifies American Abstract Expressionism and the style known as Color Field painting. Rothko sought to use large chromatic planes to express universal human emotions through the contemplation of color, often in the form of large chromatic planes.

My conclusion on visiting the Museum; it’s the building that’s the significant art work. While it’s interior is impressive in it’s combination of materials, angles and views, the museum is best viewed from afar. Here’s my brief photo montage of some of the art. [Note, photography of the art was discouraged, so only two photos, a Rothko and a Warhol. Click on images to enlarge.]

Art to suit all tastes at FCSA’s annual exhibition

The Frimley and Camberley Society of Arts 56th annual exhibition is at High Cross Church, Knoll Road, Camberley. I attended the well attended preview evening yesterday evening, where the Chairman of the FCSA, Carole Head, invited the Mayor of our borough to open the exhibition.

As a selling exhibition, a small red dot in the bottom right hand corner of the painting indicates that it’s sold. My favourite painting, I noted had that red dot. Anyway, here’s my brief photo montage of the exhibition.

Painting of the week No.16: The Menin Road by Paul Nash

Gosh, my last painting of the week was in October last year, and here’s me who likes art in all its forms. I said that I’d attended the Paul Nash and David Hockney exhibitions at Tate Britain. So you, no doubt, expect a painting of the week from the exhibitions.

I find Paul Nash’s work to contain an indefinable sense of Englishness. For me he follows the tradition of English landscape painting, though from a modernist and surrealist perspective; influenced as he was by the work of such as Rene Magritte, and Ben Nicholson, Henry Moore, and Barbara Hepworth.

It is Nash’s work as a war artist in World War I, and to a lesser degree in World War II when his health had given out, that is exceptional, displaying anger at the desolation, and despoliation of the battlefields. My selected work from Nash’s oeuvre is his monumental painting [6ft x 10ft] – The Menin Road, painted between 1918 and 1919. Here’s the painting, and beneath which are a number of sources on Nash and his work. [click on image to expand]

the-menin-road-by-paul-nash-1919

An afternoon of culture-vulturing in London

Tate Britain is currently hosting exhibitions by Paul Nash [1889 -1946], and David Hockney. Being an art lover, I couldn’t resist visiting the opportunity to see both exhibitions. Storm Doris wasn’t going to put me off, I visited yesterday afternoon.

I’ve got enough favourite images from both exhibitions for Painting of the Week blog posts for weeks to come. I ought to say right away that I prefer Paul Nash art to that of David Hockney, and I’ll explain why later.

nash-hockney-exhibitions

Upcoming Events #4: Royal Holloway Picture Gallery afternoon of drawing and discussion

Royal Holloway – University of London hold many EVENTS open to the public. Some require booking, many don’t. One such free event is and afternoon of drawing and discussion on Wednesday afternoon 22nd February, from 13.30 pm to 15.00 pm, in the Picture Gallery, studying this picture in particular.

royal-holloway-picture-gallery-discussion

Join the Art Society and College Curator, Harriet O’Neill in Royal Holloway’s Picture Gallery for an afternoon of drawing and discussion. During this session we will explore the collection Thomas Holloway purchased for the University through the lens of physiognomy.

There is no need to book and charcoal, oil pastels and paper will be provided. This is a drop-in event so please come along for as long as you are able

Decorative and fine arts appreciation in Camberley

Here’s a local society about which I knew not – shame on me. It’s the Camberley Decorative & Fine Arts Society, which is part of a national organisation NADFAS. The societies say they’re function is,

to advance decorative and fine arts education and appreciation, alongside promoting the conservation of our artistic heritage.

The Camberley society say they’ve over 190 members, and hold regular talks at High Cross Church on the 4th Wednesday of almost every month. Their 2017 lecture programme can be seen HERE. Their upcoming lecture on Wednesday 22nd February, from 1.50 pm to 3.15 pm is on Lawrence of Arabia; Excavating a Legend by Dr Neil Faulkner, who is “joint academic director of the Great Arab Revolt Project which has been exploring the archaeology of WW1 in the deserts of southern Jordan since 1996.”

Here’s the front and back page of their advertising flyer, [click on image to expand].

cdfas

Landseer’s painting Man Proposes, God Disposes discussed

Here’s an opportunity to listen discussion of Sir Edwin Landseer’s painting Man Proposes, God Disposes, in both its historical contexts and in light of recent discoveries relating to Sir John Franklin’s journey to the Arctic.

It’s a free event, in the Picture Gallery of Royal Holloway, University of London in Egham. PS. Professor Dodds is not a relative – but hey, you never know, as I’ve never really looked at our family tree.

man-proposes-god-disposes